attitude

Some people believe that good nutrition and a good training program are the only way to achieve great results.  I disagree.  I have met many people who for the most part eat everything that they are supposed to and train hard almost daily.  I have seen  their sweat and heard their stories.  I have also seen them go nowhere. There is another piece of the puzzle that if you don’t have, the other two are meaningless.

Consider these questions:

Do you skip your programmed training on a regular basis?

Still struggling to deadlift 1.5X your bodyweight?

Is there still junkfood in your cabinets?

Have you been complaining for over a year that you are too fat?

Do you go to the gym to train because you “have” to get in shape?

Do you know what you have to do but still don’t do it?

More often than not are you just going through the motions?

If you answered yes to at least one of these questions then the problem lies not in your training or your diet.  The problem isn’t in carbohydrates or your metabolism.  It isn’t in the fact that you are male or female.  Although it may lie in your current program, that is still not the problem here.  The problem is in your attitude.

At the most fundamental level, the training we do is the consequence of an attitude.  Not the other way around.  If you don’t want to work hard, if you don’t want to train, if you don’t want to make progress; don’t bother showing up.  Without the right attitude you will just be spinning your wheels.  If your mind is doing one thing and your body another, nothing is gained.

Excuses are for the weak minded.

When I meet with a potential client I can usually tell whether or not they are willing and ready to train.  I make it clear that I am a teacher, not a drill sargeant.  I write the program and share as much of my knowledge with them as possible.  The willingness to train is up to them.

What I look for in my clients:

  • Desire
  • Accountability
  • Perseverance
  • The Right Attitude

Having a bad attitude when it comes to diet or training will destroy your focus and cause you to never reach your goals.  This does not mean you can’t have a bad day or even a bad week when it comes to training.  I have them all the time.  Just go in, train and understand that it is only temporary.  Some athletes will use emotions such as rage, despair and insecurity to train even harder.  A bad attitude will only prevent you from realizing your desires.

A good attitude, on the other hand, will allow you to actualize and achieve a goal.  This does not necessarily mean that you always have to be in a “good” mood.  Go train after a bad day at work or at home and tell me that you didn’t have one of the best workouts of your life.  Lift something heavy, slam something or push a sled.  Use your anger, fear, confusion or doubt as your fuel to achieve something greater.  No matter what your emotion, possessing a good attitude will provide you the momentum towards action and success.

To have a good attitude you must commit.  The only other option here is to not. Saying you are going to commit towards improvement means nothing.  Action means everything.  Typically, when someone is unable to train on their own, to come in when they are having a bad day, to keep their priorities in line, to make sacrifices, to ultimately reach their own goals then they are not ready to commit.  Stress and hardship clarify commitment.  The committed are aware every hour of every day to the results that their actions produce and take necessary steps to achieve their goals.

So what makes a good attitude?

An open mind yields a good attitude.  Commitment yields a good attitude.  Accountability yields a good attitude.  Perseverance yields a good attitude.  Strength despite size and circumstance yields a good attitude.  Dedication yields a good attitude.

What does a good attitude give you?  Greatness.


Written by Steve